Breughel Icarus Analysis Essay - Essay for you

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Breughel Icarus Analysis Essay

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A JOURNEY THROUGH MUSEE DES BEAUX ARTS WITH ICARUS AS YOUR GUIDE! 11 th Grade Literature Mrs

A JOURNEY THROUGH MUSEE DES BEAUX ARTS WITH ICARUS AS YOUR GUIDE! 11 th Grade Literature Mrs. Sara Burlison Hi! I am Icarus. Presentation on theme: "A JOURNEY THROUGH MUSEE DES BEAUX ARTS WITH ICARUS AS YOUR GUIDE! 11 th Grade Literature Mrs. Sara Burlison Hi! I am Icarus."— Presentation transcript:

2 A JOURNEY THROUGH MUSEE DES BEAUX ARTS WITH ICARUS AS YOUR GUIDE! 11 th Grade Literature Mrs. Sara Burlison Hi! I am Icarus.

3 ICARUS WILL GUIDE YOU THROUGH A TOUR OF THE MUSEE DES BEAUX, WHICH MEANS MUSEUM OF THE BEAUTIFUL ARTS. YOU WILL MEET THE AUTHOR OF THE POEM BY THE SAME TITLE, AND THE ARTIST WHO PAINTED THE ART REPRESENTED IN THE POEM. THROUGHOUT THE FIELD TRIP YOU WILL SEE YOUR VOCABULARY WORDS. IF YOU CLICK ON THEM, IT WILL TAKE YOU BACK TO THE VOCABULARY PAGE. AT THE END, THERE WILL BE AN ASSIGNMENT FOR YOU TO COMPLETE BY OCTOBER 15 TH. Start Objectives Vocabulary Stop 1 Stop 2 Stop 3 Stop 4Stop 5 Stop 6 Stop 7 AssignmentFinal Stop

4 STANDARDS CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.0-10.5:Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it, and manipulate time create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.7:Analyze the representation of a subject or key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment. CCSS.ELA-Literacy. RL.9-10.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone. Instructions Objectives Vocab 1 2 3 4 5 6 Final Stop Assignment

5 Objectives Students will review the terms of the poetry unit and be able to apply them in an analysis of a text. Students will learn about W.H. Auden and be able to write about his life. Students will be able to identify the poem, Musee des Beaux by W.H. Auden. Students will be able to write an analysis of the poem using the vocabulary. Students will be able to identify the art of Brueger that is applicable to Musee des Beaux. Students will be able to compare and contrast the poem with the art. Instructions Standards Vocab 1 2 3 4 5 6 Final Stop Assignment

6 VOCABULARY Icarus: in Greek Mythology the son of Daedalus who flew too close to the sun Old Masters: European painters of skill Allusion: a reference used to call something to the readers mind Enjambment: continuation of a thought over a line break Imagery: language that appeals to the readers senses Free Verse: poem with no rhyme scheme Hey! Thats me! Instructions Objectives Standards 1 2 3 4 5 6 Final Stop Assignment

7 The Author: W.H. Auden Click on the pictures to read two different accounts of Audens life. Click on the name for a timeline. Instructions Objectives Standards 2 3 4 5 6 Final Stop Assignment Vocabulary

8 Click on the picture of Breughel to read his biography. Click on the picture of the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels to see Breughel's collection. THE ARTIST. PIETER BREUGEL THE ELDER Instructions Objectives Standards 1 3 4 5 6 Final Stop Assignment Vocabulary

9 READ AND LISTEN TO the poem, MUSEE DE BEAUX, BY CLICKING ON THE PENCIL AND EAR. Instructions Objectives Standards Vocabulary 1 4 5 6 Final Stop Assignment 2

10 About suffering they were never wrong, The Old Masters; how well, they understood Its human position; how it takes place While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along;Old Masters Enjambment Allusion Imagery Musee Des Beaux Musee Des Beaux Lines 1-5 Allusion Click on Old Masters and Musee Des Beaux to read about what it alludes. Instructions Objectives Standards Vocabulary 1 3 5 6 Final Stop Assignment 2

11 How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting For the miraculous birth, there always must be Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating On a pond at the edge of the wood: Brueghel. The Census at Bethlehem.1566. Museum of Arts. Brussels. Web. 29, September, 2013. Enjambment Imagery Lines 5-8 Instructions Objectives Standards Vocabulary 1 3 4 6 Final Stop Assignment 2

12 They never forgot That even the dreadful martyrdom must run its course Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer's horse Scratches its innocent behind on a tree. Brueghel, The Massacre of the Innocents, 1565-7. Museum of Fine Arts. Brussels. Web. 29, September, 2013. Enjambment Lines 9-13 Can u find the imagery in this section? Instructions Objectives Standards Vocabulary 1 3 4 Final Stop Assignment 2 5

13 In Breughel's Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away Quite leisurely from the disaster; the ploughman may Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry, But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green Water; and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky, had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on. Brueghel, Landscapes with the Fall of Icarus.1960.Museum of Fine Art.Brussels. Web.29, September, 2013. Allusion Imagery LINES 14-21 Is there enjambment here? enjambment Instructions Objectives Standards Vocabulary 1 3 5 6 Assignment 2 4

14 ASSIGNMENT Using the knowledge from your Virtual Field Trip answer the following. Use paragraph form when necessary. 1.) How does Auden use imagery, enjambment, and allusion in this poem (cite specific examples). 2. ) How does Bruegers art depict the poetry? What does the art portray or not portray? What does the poem emphasize and why? Does the color of the art impact the tone of the poem? (cite specific examples). 3.) The first five lines did not have a painting. Draw or paint your own. Good Luck! Instructions Objectives Standards Vocabulary 1 3 5 6 2 4 Final Stop

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Mus - e des Beaux Arts Analysis W

Musée des Beaux Arts Analysis Free Online Education from Top Universities ||| Analysis | Critique | Overview Below |||

Auden himself said \"In so far as poetry, or any of the arts, can be said to have an ulterior purpose, it is, by telling the truth, to disenchant and disintoxicate.\"
He went to the Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels and found this idea confirmed by the paintings.
3 scenes (probably from Breughel), the birth of Christ (miraculous birth), death of Christ (dreadful martyrdom) and the tragic myth of Icarus, are examples of this disenchantment.
These are just three random events, blown up by human beings themselves, to the extent in which we know them today. They have \'a human position\', just like us, they could have passed unnoticed, even so often, they could have been famous. In those paintings, they are depicted somewhere at the sideline, as part of a whole, not in the center.
Auden stresses the relativity of everything, demystifies what we, as human beings, once made seem so important.

| Posted on 2013-04-10 | by a guest

The \'human position of suffering\' describes how passive people perceive distress.
For them it has its place elsewhere, they\'re focused on themselves, on their own situation and on seemingly insignificant things.
Peoples position has not a sense of trust in others, community or caring for others.

| Posted on 2012-12-05 | by a guest

Title. refer to th musem of free arts in brukssels.
In this poem we have two ordinary events ;The first is descreption life goes until a miraculous birth.
The second event as the disastre of Icarus death happen.
IT TALK ABOUT HUMAN SUFFERING.

| Posted on 2011-12-31 | by a guest

This poem is a criticism over the indifferent attitude of the people in society, in front of whom there are a lot of miseries but they never bother about that. they always remain indifferent as if there is nothing going in front of them. The poem presents a realistic image of the modern world. As in the poem the plougman takes no notice of the splash and the suicide of the boy. In this way, the poem points towards the miseries in the world; where people have no time to communicate with each other; they are reificated and alienated and they forget to take care of others.

| Posted on 2011-11-05 | by a guest

I consider, that you are mistaken. I can defend the position.
stomatologia łódź

| Posted on 2011-08-25 | by a guest

“Musèe Des Beaux Arts” by W.H Auden uncovered the lack of interest in which people have toward miraculous or insignificant events that happens around them. He portrays that minor moments in life which seem to be miracles to some, are simply ignored by others because they are none of their business. People do not bother to pay attention on an individual or any other subjects that are not in their interest, but rather themselves. Auden develops the irony in the context to compare the reality of the outside world from the mythical tales in the poem. It depicts an individual’s accomplishment or achievements that occur and which others overlook. In addition he utilizes images of nature and movement to illustrate the normal daily environments and scenes in the story, in which reveals the message of the poem.

| Posted on 2011-05-30 | by a guest

Well, Indeed we do not care about others suffering; as West does not care about East-or \"others\". Also, Auden does not understand or realize how the life is outside of the building of the mussen because she does not belong on those people, rather, she sits and writes about it. Obviously, no one of us can understand the suffering of others because human nature is like that so, Auden gratually accepts it and she moves \"calmly\"(21)

| Posted on 2011-01-17 | by a guest

“Musee des Beaux Arts” is a poem by W.H. Auden about a speaker who views two paintings, one of a town where people are flocking in for a “miraculous birth”, and the other of the Greek “Icarus” the boy who created artificial wings from wax. The introductory stanza describes the painter’s ability to acknowledge the smaller nuances in life, that other simply ignore. This leads into the format of Auden’s poem, where he emphasis the aspects of a painting that people normally ignore. While just a painting, Auden gives life, emotions, and thought into some of the subjects, like the children skating in the pond; Auden’s guess that children did not want siblings represents something deeper, in which, literally, the smaller people’s opinions are ignored. This is expressed again by the dog, who has no voice in his decision to be chained up in the “torturer’s house”. His final stanza is about Icarus and how although famous he could be; everyone at the moment is minding their own business. This suggests the reality of attention in the world, and how nobody really cares about their success or failure, just like how nobody cares about the opinions of the dog and children in the previous painting. The fact that ordinary events are surrounding famous moments may suggest that art is about telling the truth and not praising some famous people and event.

| Posted on 2010-12-14 | by a guest

This poem is a call to action for society to \"wake up\".duh. There are devestating things going on in the world - AIDS in Africa, disaster in Haiti, poverty world-wide - yet, not everyone (in the West) seems to care. I love this poem because it is a true account of human nature; if you\'re not suffering, why should you?

| Posted on 2010-10-20 | by a guest

This poem is a call to action for society to "wake up". There are devestating things going on in the world - AIDS in Africa, disaster in Haiti, poverty world-wide - yet, not everyone (in the West) seems to care. I love this poem because it is a true account of human nature; if you're not suffering, why should you?

| Posted on 2010-03-24 | by a guest

The universal theme presented in Auden's work is that life goes on. The poem is primarily based on Breughel's Icarus, a famous painting in which Auden alludes to. The painting, just like Auden's poem, presents the idea that reverence is diminishing in society. Just as the ploughman continues walking on, even though he possibly heard Icarus's cry in the water below him, he kept on with his life, just as we do as a society. In our society, the failures of others are "not an important failure" to us.

| Posted on 2010-02-25 | by a guest

This poem is largely about how personal suffering is subjective and has little impact on teh world outside. the poem juxtaposes oridnary things in life with the extrodinary things in life for example the borth of the miraculous son and children skating on thepond.

| Posted on 2010-01-16 | by a guest

Musee� De Beaux Arts
It is a poem by W.H. Auden. Its main theme shows that suffering is always a subjective matter that affects only the one who suffers, while other people keep on their lives indifferent to that suffering. To support this idea Auden gives an example of the old people who waits for the miraculous birth of the Masaya, and compared them to the children who play and are uncaring about this issue, and in the last stanza, Auden talks about Burghals painting �Falling of Icarus �that tells how everyone in the picture was indifferent bout Icarus tragedy, for the ploughmen kept on ploughing, and the ship kept on sailing. In fact, it is a universal theme that people everywhere and in all times don�t care about the suffering and pains others go through. And honestly, we ourselves are some of those people. We see all this suffering in the world; and what do we do for it? We just keep on our lives as if nothing has happened, and life goes on.

| Posted on 2010-01-11 | by a guest

The poem �Mussee des Beaux Arts� is in the form of free verse. It talks about �Old Masters� and �Brueghel�s Icarus. These are images representing the suffering of human beings and the greediness of themselves. It shows that people would first save themselves before helping someone else, but this characteristic is cover up because it is unpleasant. Auden praises the artists for painting humans truthfully and showing what people try to cover up in society. The people are so into themselves that they do not see what is happening next to them such as the �miraculous birth� which may refer to Jesus, while others are �skating on a pond at the edge of the wood�.

| Posted on 2009-02-25 | by a guest

About suffering they were never wrong,
The Old Masters; how well, they understood
Its human position; how it takes place
While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along;
How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting
For the miraculous birth, there always must be
Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating
On a pond at the edge of the wood:
They never forgot
That even the dreadful martyrdom must run its course
Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot
Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer's horse
Scratches its innocent behind on a tree.

In Breughel's Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away
Quite leisurely from the disaster; the ploughman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone
As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green
Water; and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen
Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,
had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.


| Posted on 2007-09-19 | by a guest

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The Myth of Icarus

The Myth of Icarus

However, there are other interpretations and versions of the story in classical writers. Generally, these interpretations employ Icarus as a symbol of overconfidence, either childish or ambitious (Turner 21). W. H. Auden and Edward Field both make use of the myth of Icarus in their poetry. Specifically, Auden references Flemish painter Pieter Brueghel's Icarus in his poem titled "Musee des Beaux Arts" and Field considers the possibility that Icarus did not drown in his poem "Icarus." While Auden and Field use some similar themes in both poems, their execution and style differ in ways that significantly effect the structure and tone of their poems.

In "Musee des Beaux Arts" ("Museum of Fine Arts"), Auden is discussing the work of famous artists, the Old Masters. He begins the poem by commending the Old Masters for their ability to understand human suffering. Auden's position is that one person may by undergoing great suffering "[w]hile someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking along" (line 4). This sentiment rings true, for one can perhaps remember the feeling of amazement that an event of such magnitude occurs for one person while somewhere someone else is merely eating their breakfast cereal while watching a talk show. The death of one's best friend, for example, can make your world seem to stop. You are amazed that the whole world does not stop. But everywhere, people continue to eat and sleep and go to the bathroom.

Auden expresses these sentiments by referencing various works of Brueghel, as the note indicates (Roberts & Jacobs 831, note 14). The birth of Christ occurs as children ice-skate on the edge of the woods; the Crucifixion occurs as dogs "go on with their doggy life and the torturer's horse scratches its innocent behind on a tree" (lines 12-13). But he spends the most time on Brueghel's Icarus, in which Icarus falls into the sea as a farmer continues to plough his field.

More on The Myth of Icarus.

The Myth of Icarus. (1969, December 31). In LotsofEssays.com. Retrieved 20:40, February 25, 2017, from http://www.collegetermpapers.com/viewpaper/1303813277.html

Lots of Essays. "The Myth of Icarus." LotsofEssays.com. LotsofEssays.com, (December 31, 1969). Web. 25 Feb. 2017.

Lots of Essays, "The Myth of Icarus.," LotsofEssays.com, http://www.collegetermpapers.com/viewpaper/1303813277.html (accessed February 25, 2017)

Tragic fall of Icarus-compares the myth and how it relates to - Musee des Beaux Arts, Landscape with the Fall of Icarus, and - Waiting for Icarus

Tragic fall of Icarus--compares the myth and how it relates to "Musee des Beaux Arts," Landscape with the Fall of Icarus," and "Waiting for Icarus."

The Tragic Death of Icarus

The story of Icarus is a classic Greek myth that has fascinated people all over the world. The tale of his demise has been retold many times throughout history. The myth has been honored in art, songs, poetry and by literature artists, with one apparently inspiring the other to explore the tale in one different approach or another. Three of the most appealing of these versions of the tale of Icarus can be found in the poems "Musee des Beaux Arts" by W. H. Auden, "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus" by W. C. Williams, and "Waiting for Icarus" by Muriel Rukeyser. Even though the three poems talk about Icarus's fall, each covers it in a different way. "Musee des Beaux Arts" and "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus" describes how human suffering occurs at as a personal burden that only affects the influenced individual.

In addition, they both basically let us know that life goes on. In contrast, "Waiting for Icarus" is told from a personal perspective and is about broken promises, personal suffering and how it affects an individual. The first two of these poems were inspired by the painting Fall of Icarus by Peter Breughel since both of them mention Breughel by name in their poems. This painting, therefore, is vital to each of these poet's descriptions of the tale of Icarus. Breughel's painting is central in Auden's and Williams' poem, for it shows us that no one is concerned that Icarus is drowning. The people surrounded by his death look at it as a part of their everyday life. However, Rukeyeser's poem is not influenced by the painting and is about a person who is personally suffering because Icarus has not returned like he promised.

Citation styles:

Tragic fall of Icarus--compares the myth and how it relates to "Musee des Beaux Arts," Landscape with the Fall of Icarus," and "Waiting for Icarus.". (2003, June 13). In WriteWork.com. Retrieved 01:40, February 26, 2017, from http://www.writework.com/essay/tragic-fall-icarus-compares-myth-and-relates-musee-des-bea

WriteWork contributors. "Tragic fall of Icarus--compares the myth and how it relates to "Musee des Beaux Arts," Landscape with the Fall of Icarus," and "Waiting for Icarus."" WriteWork.com. WriteWork.com, 13 June, 2003. Web. 26 Feb. 2017.

WriteWork contributors, "Tragic fall of Icarus--compares the myth and how it relates to "Musee des Beaux Arts," Landscape with the Fall of Icarus," and "Waiting for Icarus."," WriteWork.com, http://www.writework.com/essay/tragic-fall-icarus-compares-myth-and-relates-musee-des-bea (accessed February 26, 2017)

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Musée des Beaux Arts: Stanza 2 Summary

Musée des Beaux Arts Stanza 2 Summary Get out the microscope, because we’re going through this poem line-by-line. Lines 13-14 In Breughel's Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away
Quite leisurely from the disaster;
  • Now we're moving onto solid ground. Our speaker's not wandering in front of random pictures anymore. He's given us a point of reference: Pieter Breughel's "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus."
  • We'll get into the painting a bit more in our "Setting" section, but for now let's just point out that it's an old painting (done in about 1558, to be precise). That's why our speaker refers to Brueghel as an "Old" master. He meant the "old" part. You can see an online version of the painting here .
  • Our speaker doesn't refer to the painting by its full title, of course – sort of like how you might talk about a painting that you just saw…or a painting that you know so well you feel like you can give it a nickname.
  • We think that the discrepancy between Brueghel's name and our speaker's reference is actually pretty interesting. It shows that, despite all evidence to the contrary, our speaker actually is interested in the story that's happening in the background.
  • Who's Icarus? We're glad you asked. Check our discussion of him in "Symbols, Imagery, Wordplay." For now, though, let's just say that he's the granddaddy of big plans that just never quite get off the ground. Literally.
Lines 14-16 the ploughman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure;
  • There's something devastating in the understatement of these lines. Sure, spring planting is an important time. Ask any farmer – they'll tell you that there's about eighteen hours of work to do in about eleven hours of daylight. Maybe our ploughman is just too busy to pay attention to noises off in the water. But from what we can tell, it sounds like someone's drowning. Heck, check out Breughel's painting if you don't agree. There are legs out there in that water! Something is not right.
  • Maybe the farmer's just got too much to do to head off and play lifeguard for silly people who shouldn't be swimming in the ocean. Maybe he's just not concerned about random sounds. Maybe people drown in that water every day. Whatever the reason, this particular fall is not important enough to merit his attention.
  • Then again, what does constitute an "important" failure? Something so dreadful that it affects 10 people? 100? 100,000? When does something become "big" enough to care about?
  • Sure, that's not what our speaker's actually saying. But he sure as heck is insinuating it. After all, a "forsaken" cry is one that people have deliberately ignored. And it's that indifference which really drives our speaker to generate this poem.
Lines 16-18 the sun shone
As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green
Water;
  • Once again, there's a certain inevitability in these lines. The natural world goes on, no matter what happens. Dogs do what dogs do. The sun does what it always does: it shines.
  • Notice how Auden manages to make this both a story and a description? Here's what we mean by that: he's allowing the speaker to narrate Brueghel's painting – and in so doing, he makes all the action happen in real time. We are there as the sun is shining and Icarus is drowning. Does that make his version more real or more alive than Brueghel's? Not necessarily. But it does make us pay attention to the temporality of Icarus's fall. It's no longer static. It happens across time – the time that it takes us to read the last few lines, as a matter of fact. And that drawn-out falling makes the tragedy of Icarus' death all the more excruciating to witness.
  • Then again, our speaker could just be describing what he sees in the painting. Brueghel manages to make the light strike Icarus's legs. That's how we know that he's actually in the water. That and the fact that Brueghel tossed his name into the painting's title, of course.
Lines 18-20 and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen
Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,
had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on .
  • Wow. These lines sure do pack a wallop. Check out the dictionary definition for "selfish, indifferent jerk" and you'll probably find something that looks a lot like these lines.
  • All of the peace and tranquility in this poem (and, well, in the painting to which it refers) gets exposed as something that looks a lot like hypocrisy. Sure, everything is expensive and beautiful and perfect. But that's only a thin veneer over what's actually the action in this scene – a terrible, terrifying drowning.
  • Like Brueghel, Auden is emphasizing Icarus's surroundings. In so doing, he transforms the myth; it's no longer about a boy who dreamed too big and couldn't figure out how to fly. It's about all the simple, ordinary people who wouldn't go out of their way to pull a drowning boy out of the water. Sure, the ordinary stuff might not be quite as exciting as the myth. Heck, it's not even what art is supposed to be about, is it? We're supposed to be reading about heroes and dragons and martyrs and all the flashy stuff, right?
  • Maybe not. Maybe Auden's point is that even the heroes need ordinary people to do extraordinary things sometimes. Or even just behave like sympathetic human beings.
  • Auden's poem doesn't emphasize the extraordinary – just like the rest of the lines, these lines are simple. No tricky words. No fancy rhymes. In so doing, he could just be normalizing the sorts of indifference he describes. Several critics (we won't name any names) have said just that.
  • We wonder, though, if he's not exposing that indifference for what it is: an unwillingness to recognize amazing things or out of the ordinary things or even just awful things. In other words, this poem is asking us to open our eyes. You just never know what you're going to see once you do.
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