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Battle Of The Bulge Memorial Address Essay

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The Battle of the Bulge Essay examples - WWII, history

The Battle of the Bulge Essay examples

“Yesterday, December 7, 1941 - a date which will live in infamy - the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.” - President Franklin D. Roosevelt. December 7th 1941 marked an event in history that everyone in the world looks back to. On that date the Imperial Japanese Navy surprised attacked the American port of Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii. This marked the beginning of World War II for America. World War II was the bloodiest war in history with over 60 million deaths. World War II started in Europe when an Nazi controlled Germany invaded Poland on September 1st, 1939. Great Britain entered the war soon after along with the rest of her (Great Britain's) allies starting World War II. Fast forward to June 6th, 1944, American, British and Canadian forces have began Operation Overlord (Invasion of Normandy). Now with a beachhead on Northern France the allied forces from the west can push into occupied France and Belgium. It would not be a easy task though. In between the two forces stands Germany ready to fight back both fronts with whatever forces Germany has. After the liberation of France on August 16th the pressure was on to beat the Russians to Berlin. In December of 1944 the Germans were losing the war on both fronts with lots of casualties. Germany had to do one last push on the Allies in the West to try and get a peace agreement. If the push failed then Germany is lost. on December 16th, 1944, the last German offensive has started. This battle was the Battle of the Bulge also known as the Battle of Bastogne or the Battle of the Ardennes. The Battle of the Bulge was the last German assault that failed greatly and lead to the Germans losing important forc.


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Works Cited
Baker, Anni P. American soldiers overseas the global military presence. Westport, Conn. Praeger, 2004. Print.
Bedessem, Edward N. Central Europe. Washington, D.C. U.S. Army Center of Military History. 1996. Print.
Cirillo, Roger. "Ardennes-Alsace." Ardennes-Alsace. N.p. n.d. Web. 26 May 2014.
Cole, Hugh M. The Ardennes: Battle of the Bulge. Washington: Office of the Chief of Military History, Dept. of the Army; for sale by the Supt. of Docs. U.S. Govt. Print. Off. 1965. Print.
MacDonald, Charles B. A time for trumpets: the untold story of the Battle of the Bulge. New York: William Morrow, 1985. Print.
Quarrie, Bruce. The Ardennes offensive. Oxford: Osprey, 1999. Print.
Zaloga, Steve. Remagen 1945: endgame against the Third Reich. Oxford, U.K. Osprey Pub. 2006. Print.

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The Battle of the Bulge Essay examples - “Yesterday, December 7, 1941 - a date which will live in infamy - the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.” - President Franklin D. Roosevelt. December 7th 1941 marked an event in history that everyone in the world looks back to. On that date the Imperial Japanese Navy surprised attacked the American port of Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii. This marked the beginning of World War II for America. World War II was the bloodiest war in history with over 60 million deaths. [tags: WWII, history]
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Essay on The Battle of the Bulge - Nazi Germany’s strategy of blitzkrieg, lightning war, had managed to overrun or subdue every nation on continental Europe, up until the involvement of the United States Armed Forces in World War II. The rapid fall of Holland and Belgium on 10 May 1940 set the tone for all of Adolf Hitler’s attacks on the European War front. Germany dominated the continent from 1940 until the U.S.-led invasion of mainland Europe on 6 June 1944. Germany seemed to have firm control over its gains, from air raids over London to the massive push into Russia. [tags: World War II, World History]
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Essay about Battle Of The Bulge - The Battle of the Bulge The battle of the bulge was Hitler's last chance to win the war or at least make the allies go for a treaty. He did this because his forces were being pushed back into Germany and soon they would run out of supplies and other resources for war. Hitler thought of this bold plan when he recalled how a German hero Frederick the great was facing defeat, Frederick went on a offensive attack at his foe who had superior numbers but the bold moved worked and Hitler thought he could do the same thing. [tags: German History War Hitler Battle Essays]
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Essay about The Battle of the Bulge - The Battle of the Bulge The purpose of this speech for the class is to gain better knowledge of one of the most tragic and devastating battles of World War II, the Battle of the Bulge. To Better understand The Battle of the Bulge I will explain to you the cause of the battle, location of the battle, when it took place, who was the battle fought between, the number of soldiers involved, and the number of casualties. The prelude to the Battle of the Bulge began on a winter day in mid-December of 1944. [tags: World War II History]

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Essay about Battle of the Bulge - British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill declared the Allied Victory at the Ardennes campaign, of which he dubbed the Battle of the Bulge, “undoubtedly the greatest American battle of the war and will, I believe, be regarded as an ever famous American Victory”. Arguably so, as great a victory as it was for the Americans, it would go on to become an even greater victory for the Allies against Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler. The summer of 1944 had been a catastrophic one for Hitler and Germany. [tags: essays research papers fc]
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General Patton and Mission Command: The Battle of the Bulge Essay - Operational leaders see how the individual components of an organization fit together and use those individuals work to make a larger outcome. When they focus on a problem, they think of what works best within the process and systems to make an impact on the situation. These types of leaders play a big part in making sure that things get done in an effective and functioning manner. According to the Army Doctrine ADP 6-0, the Army over time has strayed away from operational leaders and adapted Mission Command, which gives leaders the ability at the lowest level the capability to exercise disciplined initiative in an act of carrying out the larger mission. [tags: history, general patton]
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The Battle of the Bulge and the End of World War II Essay - On a frigid December morning on the Ardennes Range. An erie moonlit fog covers the land. Thousands of sleeping Allied soldiers are awakened by the buzzing of artillery shells and enemy mortars crashing near their resting places. The Battle of the Bulge will forever be one of the most influential battles of World War II. At around 5:30 AM, on December 6, 1944, a report of strange flickering lights on the German front line came into Allied headquarters from a lone American sentry at the front of the allied lines. [tags: Allies,Hitler, Second World War]
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Battle of the Bulge - A World War 2 Battle Essay - Battle of the Bulge - A World War 2 Battle The World War Two was a very severe war. There were many battles that were fought during it. One of the biggest land battles was Battle of the Bulge. (http://helios.) The battle took place on December 16, 1944 under cover a very dense fog which was very difficult for the army to see. (Danzer et. al. 744) These conditions are hard to see in but to stage of the biggest land battle in the history of World War Two, it was truly an astounding event and a very tragic memory. [tags: World War II History]

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The Worlds Battle with Obesity Essay - Introduction Obesity occurs when a person’s weight is far above his/her ideal body weight. The Obesity epidemic has actually become a worldwide problem that has global implications for health and disease. Being obese is no longer just a western problem, people are getting fatter in all parts of the world and obesity rates are rising ,with an estimated 60% men and 50% women are either overweight or obese. Obesity is a complex phenomenon, and used to be more of a western problem. Besides the United States who has been fighting the battle with the bulge for quite a while now ,other regions are also growing fast in the waist such as Latin America, The Middle East and Western and Southern Africa. [tags: physical activity, healthy food]
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Battle of the Bulge - a World War 2 Battle Essay - 771 Words

Battle of the Bulge - a World War 2 Battle

The World War Two was a very severe war. There were many battles that were fought during it. One of the biggest land battles was Battle of the Bulge. (http://helios.) The battle took place on December 16, 1944 under cover a very dense fog which was very difficult for the army to see. (Danzer et. al. 744) These conditions are hard to see in but to stage of the biggest land battle in the history of World War Two, it was truly an astounding event and a very tragic memory.

The battle was fought in a heavily forested Ardennes region of eastern Belgium and northern Luxembourg (http://www.mm.) The fact that the battle was fought in a heavy forested area, with the conditions of the fog made the battle more dangerous, because the sight was poor and there was no clue where the opposite army was hidden.

The Battle of the Bulge was a very vicious battle that had taken place. The battle included 600,000 Germans, 500,000 Americans and 55,000 British. (http://helios.) More than one million of the worlds' men fought in this battle. It claimed 100,000 German casualties, killed wounded or captured, 81,000 American casualties, including 23,554 captured and 19,000 killed, 1,400 British casualties and 200 killed. (http://www.mm.) This was a massive amount of people to be killed in one horrible battle in the world's history. The Germans led by Hitler went westward, they captured 120 American GI's near Malmedy, they herded the prisoners into a field and shot them with machine guns and pistols. (Danzer et. al. 744) This was a very vicious thing that the Germans had done to the US GI's.

The American troops led by Brigadier General Anthony McAuliffe led the troops to Bastogne, a city of Belgium, were badly surrounded and our numbered by the Germans, that is were the American troops were demanded to surrender. (Danzer et. al. 744). In the end there were 800 tanks lost on each side, and 1,000 German aircraft lost as well. (http://www.mm.) This was a lot of.

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The battle of the bulge The battle of the bulge was Hitler's last chance to win the war or at least make the allies go for a treaty. He did this because his forces were being pushed back into Germany and soon they would run out of supplies and other resources for war . Hitler thought of this bold plain when he recalled how a German hero Frederick the great was facing defeat, Frederick went on a offensive attack at his foe who had superior numbers but the bold moved worked and Hitler thought he could do the same thing. The Battle of the bulge took place on December sixteenth 1944. More than a million men participated in this battle including some 600,000 Germans, 500,000 Americans, and 55,000 British which made it one of the biggest battles of the war . It happened at the same place were the Germans first crossed over to attack France the Ardennes forest. The allies who were stationed there called it a ghost front because there was never any fighting so the allies sent their new solders and the tired battered solders here. The Germans mobilized at this last chance they had to win the war and if they would lose this battle Hitler wanted all the Germans left in Germany to all burn any thing useful in Germany and every one to move to Berlin were all the German people would fight.

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The Battle of the Bulge was the single biggest battle fought by the United States Army during WorldWar II. Also this was the most confusing. In the memories of the Americans who tried to understand what happened in those dark days of December in 1944, the name Bastogne is special. The heroic defenses of St. Vith and the Elsenborn ridge area were just as important to the outcome of the area; however, Bastogne remains the enduring symbol of the American fight against odds in the Ardennes. It is not hard to see why this is so. Bastogne was a battle within a battle . clearly visible and very dramatic. It was big enough to be vitally important and small enough to be easily understood. When he first learned of the German counterattack on the December 16 afternoon, Dwight Eisenhower had ordered two armored divisions, the 7th and 10th, to converge on the Ardennes from north and south to pinch off the penetration.[1] By the next day it was clear that the breakthrough was far too big to be so easily fixed. Eisenhower then reached for his only divisions in general reserve on the continent; the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions. They were stationed near the French city of Reims. These were the elite divisions, but they had just experienced seventy-two straight days of bitter combat near Arnhem in Holland and they were very tired. Like Troy Middleton’s army divisions.

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Battle Of the Bulge The Battle of the Bulge . still to this day, is the largest battle in American History. The battle was very important in the outcome of WorldWar II, and the aftermath of the war itself. The attack began just before dawn on December 16, 1944. The Battle of the Bulge was located in the Ardennes. This was probably the most intense battle ever fought when many lives lost. Adolf Hitler directed this counteroffensive with the objective to cut off and annihilate the British 21st Army and the U.S. first and ninth armies north of the Ardennes. Six inches of snow covered the ground with bitterly cold temperatures, perhaps the coldest winter yet. With this cold, stormy weather, the Germans attacked the allies, but the attack only resulted in a large bulge in the allied lines. The German's first objective was not so much achieved, but started the battle off in their favor and in their advantage. Another part of the German plan was that the Germans wanted to capture the town of Bastogne, which was very important because it contained many vital roads that the Germans wanted to have. If the allies were able to obtain Bastogne, it would greatly slow down the German forces. The delay made it possible for the 101st Airborne to enter Bastogne before the German.

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Battle of the Bulge Essay - 1598 Words

Battle of the Bulge

The battle of the bulge

The battle of the bulge was Hitler's last chance to win the war or at least make the allies go for a treaty. He did this because his forces were being pushed back into Germany and soon they would run out of supplies and other resources for war. Hitler thought of this bold plain when he recalled how a German hero Frederick the great was facing defeat, Frederick went on a offensive attack at his foe who had superior numbers but the bold moved worked and Hitler thought he could do the same thing.

The Battle of the bulge took place on December sixteenth 1944. More than a million men participated in this battle including some 600,000 Germans, 500,000 Americans, and 55,000 British which made it one of the biggest battles of the war. It happened at the same place were the Germans first crossed over to attack France the Ardennes forest. The allies who were stationed there called it a ghost front because there was never any fighting so the allies sent their new solders and the tired battered solders here.

The Germans mobilized at this last chance they had to win the war and if they would lose this battle Hitler wanted all the Germans left in Germany to all burn any thing useful in Germany and every one to move to Berlin were all the German people would fight to the death. The Germans needed to cut the American forces in to two parts, this way the could easily be destroyed because the allies all ready had a tough time supplying all the troops and Hitler new that if they took control of Antwerp he would have a chance against the allies.

Hitler felt he had enough of the resources he would need to win the battle. The main things that the Germans were hoping for was bad weather so that the allies planes could not get off the ground and support the allies and fire upon the German forces the other main thing the Germans needed was complete surprise. Hitler was mobilizing a task force of 500,000 Germans solders which included tanks special spies and many others. The allies at this time was slowly pushing its way through the Ardennes Forest and into Germany they also were pushing into the Belgium Boarder. But they were having a tough time getting past the maginot line in France.

The allies had a force of 600,000 American solders And 55,000 British solders. Hitler hoped to surprise the Allies off guard and quickly separate the army. The Germans decided to pushed through this area because they felt this was the least likely of a place the Americans thought would be attacked thus assault the Allies off guard. It was the place were they had great success against the French people in the beginning of the war. The Germans also selected it because it was easy to hide troops in the hills which they did at the first major offensive. Hitler code-named this attack as the "watch am Rein" The Americans the area were in a thin line because they wanted to give support to the flank were the attack was expected so they thought.

During the War Eisenhower and his staff felt this spot was the least likely to be attacked. The thought the Germans would not try any thing through the narrow passageway. The Germans wanted the opposite of what the Americans wanted to do. As stated above the Allied troops were 'resting' and reforming; they consisted of General Simpson's 9th Army and General Hodges 1st US Army in the north and General Patton's 3rd Army to the south. The Ardennes was held by General Middleton who had the 8th US Army Corps, 106th and 26th Infantry Divisions and 4th and 9th Armored Divisions.

The object of the German offensive was to push through the Belgian Ardennes, cross the Mousse, retake Antwerp and its harbor facilities, thrust to the north and reach the sea which they almost succeed in doing. This would cut off the Allied troops in Holland and Belgium, making it impossible for them to withdraw. The success of the operation depended on three important parts, the speed of the initial.

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The battle was known by different names. The Germans referred to it as Unternehmen Wacht am Rhein ("Operation Watch on the Rhine"), while the French named it the Bataille des Ardennes ("Battle of the Ardennes"). The Allies called it the Ardennes Counteroffensive. The phrase "Battle of the Bulge " was coined by contemporary press to describe the way the Allied front line bulged inward on wartime news maps[22][h][23] and became the best known name for the battle . The German offensive was supported by several subordinate operations known as Unternehmen Bodenplatte, Greif, and Währung. Germany's goal for these operations was to split the British and American Allied line in half, capture Antwerp, and then proceed to encircle and destroy four Allied armies, forcing the Western Allies to negotiate a peace treaty in the Axis Powers' favour. Once that was accomplished, Hitler could fully concentrate on the eastern theatre of war.The offensive was planned with the utmost secrecy, minimizing radio traffic and moving troops and equipment under cover of darkness. The Third U.S. Army's intelligence staff predicted a major German offensive, and Ultra indicated that a "substantial and offensive" operation was expected or "in the wind", although a precise date or point of attack could not be given. Aircraft movement from the Russian Front and transport of forces by rail, both to the Ardennes, was noticed but not acted.

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The Battle of the Bulge was the single biggest battle fought by the United States Army during World War II. Also this was the most confusing. In the memories of the Americans who tried to understand what happened in those dark days of December in 1944, the name Bastogne is special. The heroic defenses of St. Vith and the Elsenborn ridge area were just as important to the outcome of the area; however, Bastogne remains the enduring symbol of the American fight against odds in the Ardennes. It is not hard to see why this is so. Bastogne was a battle within a battle . clearly visible and very dramatic. It was big enough to be vitally important and small enough to be easily understood. When he first learned of the German counterattack on the December 16 afternoon, Dwight Eisenhower had ordered two armored divisions, the 7th and 10th, to converge on the Ardennes from north and south to pinch off the penetration.[1] By the next day it was clear that the breakthrough was far too big to be so easily fixed. Eisenhower then reached for his only divisions in general reserve on the continent; the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions. They were stationed near the French city of Reims. These were the elite divisions, but they had just experienced seventy-two straight days of bitter combat near Arnhem in Holland and they were very tired. Like Troy Middleton’s army divisions stationed in the Ardennes, they were.

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Battle Of the Bulge The Battle of the Bulge . still to this day, is the largest battle in American History. The battle was very important in the outcome of World War II, and the aftermath of the war itself. The attack began just before dawn on December 16, 1944. The Battle of the Bulge was located in the Ardennes. This was probably the most intense battle ever fought when many lives lost. Adolf Hitler directed this counteroffensive with the objective to cut off and annihilate the British 21st Army and the U.S. first and ninth armies north of the Ardennes. Six inches of snow covered the ground with bitterly cold temperatures, perhaps the coldest winter yet. With this cold, stormy weather, the Germans attacked the allies, but the attack only resulted in a large bulge in the allied lines. The German's first objective was not so much achieved, but started the battle off in their favor and in their advantage. Another part of the German plan was that the Germans wanted to capture the town of Bastogne, which was very important because it contained many vital roads that the Germans wanted to have. If the allies were able to obtain Bastogne, it would greatly slow down the German forces. The delay made it possible for the 101st Airborne to enter Bastogne before the German attack. The Germans then surrounded the.

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The World War Two was a very severe war. There were many battles that were fought during it. One of the biggest land battles was Battle of the Bulge . (http://helios.) The battle took place on December 16, 1944 under cover a very dense fog which was very difficult for the army to see. (Danzer et. al. 744) These conditions are hard to see in but to stage of the biggest land battle in the history of World War Two, it was truly an astounding event and a very tragic memory. <br> <br>The battle was fought in a heavily forested Ardennes region of eastern Belgium and northern Luxembourg (http://www.mm.) The fact that the battle was fought in a heavy forested area, with the conditions of the fog made the battle more dangerous, because the sight was poor and there was no clue where the opposite army was hidden. <br> <br>The Battle of the Bulge was a very vicious battle that had taken place. The battle included 600,000 Germans, 500,000 Americans and 55,000 British. (http://helios.) More than one million of the worlds' men fought in this battle . It claimed 100,000 German casualties, killed wounded or captured, 81,000 American casualties, including 23,554 captured and 19,000 killed, 1,400 British casualties and 200 killed. (http://www.mm.) This was a massive amount of people to be killed in.

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Russia’s victory at the Battle of Stalingrad was crucial to the Russians’ war effort. Russia’s army had been decimated in the purge of the armed forces and Stalin, leader of Russia, was compelled to enter the Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact for security, The Battle of Stalingrad became a war of attrition. Stalin, in a broadcasted speech to the nation rallied his people to fight for the motherland. Consequently over one million Soviet men and Woman died to defend Stalingrad. Proving that patriotism played a big part in The Battle of Stalingrad. Perhaps, one of Stalin’s first mistakes leading up to the Battle of Stalingrad was the Purge of the Armed Forces. In 1937 he had felt threatened that someone in the military would overthrow his power. The various purges were aspects of Stalin’s way of gaining absolute control of the Soviet Union. The 1937 to 1939 purge of the armed forces was one of Stalin’s ways of instilling terror into the Soviet people, by it creating a sense of fear and uncertainty. During this time, Stalin had 35,000 Soviet soldiers arrested, exiled or executed – over 50% of them were officers. All 11 war commissars were removed from office, 14 out of the 16 army commanders and 91 of the 101-man supreme military council were arrested. Russia’s military was left poorly equipped, poorly trained and poorly led, effectively leaving the Soviet military ill-prepared for enemy aggression, including the.

1002 Words | 3 Pages

Battle of the Somme The year was 1916 and the Battle of the Somme may have been the largest battle in the First World War. There were more than one million casualties and men faced each other over the decaying wastes of No Man's Land, and confronted the realities of dirt, disease, and death. The attack was expanded over 30 kilometers, from north of the Somme river between Arras and Albert. The battle lasted from July 1 until November 18, and included a one day record for troops lost. The first day on the Somme The planned attack would include 13 British divisions (11 from the Fourth Army and two from the Third Army) staged north of the Somme river, and on the south side of the river the French Sixth Army was also ready to attack on command. On the opposing side of things stood the German Second Army commanded by General Fritz von Below. July 1, 1916, 7:30 a.m. was known as zero hour for the Battle of the Somme. Little did the Germans know that a few days prior the British had dug 10 mines beneath the German front-line trenches and strong points; the three largest mines included 20 tons of explosives each. Ten minutes before zero hour at 7:20 a.m. the mine beneath Hawthorne Ridge Redbout was detonated. With in eight minutes the remaining mines exploded causing a tremendous surprise for the Germans. There was brief and unsettling silence after zero hour as the artillery shifted their aim onto the.

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